Breaking Bread

Over and over again in the Bible, we see the term “breaking bread”. The Bible uses this term for three different events. It is used for shared meals, Holy communion, and even talking about the Crucifixion. I loved my study of each of these specific events. Today we’ll be specifically talking about breaking bread in terms of sharing meals with others in our community for the purpose of meeting needs and providing fellowship.

Acts 2:46  “Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts”

Did you know that 20% of all American meals are eaten in the car? Another study shows that on average, nearly 50% of our meals are eaten alone. In 2010, a journal report showed that only 43% of American families eat together every day. This doesn’t even touch on how many families sit down with one another in fellowship to share a meal. As a nurse, I want to go into the negative physical and emotional health effects of our declining eating habits, but I’ll save that for another time and place. Today we’ll simply look at the importance of sitting down together and sharing a meal. I believe that in regards to fellowship and hospitality, sitting down together for a meal is one of the most important things you can do. Just the act of inviting someone to your table speaks volumes. It is a tangible way to extend love to friends and grace to strangers in need. Christ Himself extended that same grace over and over again, and we’re told that after He calls all Saints home for good, we are invited to sit at the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. (Revelation 19)  Not a church service, not a conference, not a seminar. But at the table.

Jesus didn’t run projects, establish ministries, or put on events. He ate meals”
Tim Chester “A Meal with Jesus”

One of the passages I turn to frequently to illustrate the importance of eating meals together is in the book of Acts:

Acts 2:42-46  “They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts…”

caffeine-coffee-cuisine-15280133 things happen when you sit down to a meal together

1.) Physical needs are met
It’s no secret that we need to eat to live. Whether it’s a stranger who needs a hot meal, a friend who doesn’t feel up to cooking, or that new college kid at church who could benefit from some home cooking. Romans 12:13 tells us “Share with the LORD’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality.” If there is a need, we as Believers should be the first to jump up and say “I’ll do it!” It doesn’t feel natural at first, and that’s ok. Inviting people into your home can be scary until you have experience. That’s why we’re told to practice. Start simple. Ready-to-cook pizza and bagged salad is a great place to start. Once you start feeling more comfortable having people in your home, you can start cooking. But again, stay simple and work your way up to a “from-scratch” meal. God told us to practice hospitality, not practice fine dining parties with elaborate meals. It’s not about perfection and talent, it’s about presence and togetherness. If that’s a rotisserie chicken and instant mashed potatoes, so be it.

2.) Emotional needs are met
Looking at that same passage, sometimes those needs aren’t just physical. Sometimes there are emotional needs that need to be met in a non-threatening environment. What better environment than around your kitchen table? Those who eat alone can experience more loneliness, depression, and in turn reach for unhealthy options, or skip meals altogether. By inviting those people to your table, you’re not only providing for their physical hunger, but for their emotional hunger as well. Think about how nice it feels to be asked for dinner, or even just coffee. It meets the desire for fellowship. It makes your heart happy. Sharing a meal is about more than food. It’s about friendship, grace, and love. When we sit down around a dinner table, our emotional need for connection is met. “…They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts”

3.) Spiritual needs are met
Looking through the life of Jesus, we see over and over again where he would share profound truths and encouragement with people around a table. It was around a dinner table that He redeemed Zacchaeus from a life of dishonesty and thievery (Luke 5). It was around a dinner table that He extended grace to Mary as she washed His feet (Luke 7). It was around a dinner table that He taught Mary, Martha, and Lazarus the importance of fellowship with Him (Luke 10).  It was even around a dinner table that Jesus told us that He was the only answer to our greatest need (Luke 22). There are times when people need grace or encouragement. There are times when people need to hear a hard truth. There are times when people need to dive deeper in the Word of God and learn together. Through the example of Jesus Christ Himself, we learn that there is no better place than around our table.

Following the example Jesus set for us, we can be encouraged to reach out and extend may change their life. If you are looking for more information, an excellent book that talks about this subject is “A Meal With Jesus” by Tim Chester.  I would love to hear your feedback, as well as any tips you have for simple table hospitality. Drop a comment below!

cutlery-dining-room-flatware-269264

-Paige

Recipe for Homemade Bread:

Ingredients:
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (1pkg)
2 1/4 cup warm water
1 TBS sugar PLUS 1/4 cup sugar
1 TBS salt
2 TBS olive oil
6 – 6 1/2 cups all purpose flour
Butter for pans and plastic wrap

Directions:
~In a large bowl or stand mixer, combine yeast, warm water, and 1 TBS sugar. Let stand until bubbly and foamy.
~Add remaining sugar, salt, oil, and 4 cups of the flour and mix until smooth.
~Add remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time to form a soft, smooth, and slightly sticky dough.
~Knead for 3-5 minutes until smooth and then roll into a ball.
~Place the dough in a buttered bowl and cover with buttered plastic wrap.
~Let rise for one hour in a warm place.
~When dough has risen, punch down and divide in half.
~Roll out each half into a long rectangle shape 8 inches wide. Then roll the dough up to form a log shape
~Place the dough logs seam down into a buttered pan and cover with buttered plastic wrap and a towel.
~Let rise for another hour in a warm place.
~Preheat oven to 375º. Bake for 30-35 minutes until golden brown and have a hollow sound when tapped.
~Remove to rack and cool slightly before serving.

This bread can easily be frozen by letting in cool completely and wrapping tightly in plastic wrap before putting in the freezer. I wouldn’t suggest keeping it frozen for more than 2 weeks for best taste. To use, take out and let thaw in refrigerator overnight.

Lessons From a Messy Kitchen

There have been many times that I’ve stood in the middle of my kitchen after an event thinking why do I do this to myself? My sink is full. There’s not enough room for another dish on my counter top. There is food and empty packaging everywhere. My stove is disgusting. My floors are a mess. This is the state of things every. single. time. I host an afternoon tea or a party. So why do I continue to do it? Because I’ve learned that the heart of hospitality is not showing off how organized or tidy  I can be while hosting. The heart of hospitality is how my guests feel when they walk out my door. Do they feel that this was time well spent? Are they satisfied and full? Do they feel welcomed and loved. If the answer to any of these questions is no, then I failed. It doesn’t matter how clean my house is or how tidy I kept my kitchen during preparations.

Here are 3 lessons that I’ve learned from my messy kitchen:

20191105_193745_00001.) Every dirty tea cup is a testimony to a friendship.

As I wash each teacup, I can’t help but think of the sweet friend who held it that day. I thank God for her friendship and influence in my life. I am reminded that the Bible says in Proverbs 27:9b “A sweet friendship refreshes the soul” I thank God that He has blessed me with a home to open and tea cups to use. I am reminded that James 1:17a says “every good and perfect gift is from above.” I pray that God used me to be a blessing and draw that women closer to His heart. I remember that Matthew 5:16 says “…let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.” I pray that whoever held that tea cup left my home feeling loved and cherished as a daughter of God, or that she would feel Jesus calling her to Himself. I remember that  John 15:12 says My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you.”

 

2.) Every empty package laying on my counter is a fed 20191120_092634_0000and satisfied stomach.

Have you ever been emotionally unavailable or just plain grumpy…because you were hungry? Sometimes, people just need food. There’s a reason they say the quickest way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. It’s not just men y’all. Women need food too! It’s hard to think straight, or focus energy on relationships, when you’re hungry. Sometimes, people just need a hot meal that they didn’t have to cook. Food has a way of bringing people together and making memories. J. R. R. Tolkien said “If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.” If we would spend more time around a table with a friend, or stranger, I think our culture would cease to be so self-involved and start opening their hearts.

“Cooking is love made visible “

20191105_193832_00003.) Every minute I spend cleaning reflects a priceless moment of fellowship.

People would much rather have your attention than your perfection. We see this reflected in the book of Luke chapter 10, verses 38-40.  “As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made…” If I’m spending my time in the kitchen fussing over dirty dishes, and my guests are sitting alone in my living room, what was the point of inviting them into my home? They’re probably sitting in there feeling awkward and bored to tears. The dishes can wait. My priority is making sure the people under my roof feel cherished and most of all, feel God’s love through me. Take time to spend with your guests when you host an event. Don’t spend your time running around making sure your home is perfect. Don’t busy yourself with clean up and forget the people in your home.

I love having a home full of people. I like filling bellies and putting smiles of faces through food. I like making people feel loved and cared for. So whenever I survey my kitchen littered with empty spice containers, meat wrappings, butter crocks, and food scraps, it fills my heart with joy and I will always look forward to the next time.

 

Paige Baldwin

 

An Unexpected Party

Expected company can be stressful enough to someone who is not used to, or warmed up to, the idea of opening their home. But unexpected company? What goes through your mind when you hear that phrase? To some, this is delight. To others, it’s sheer panic.

IMG_20190321_154115_767-01When my husband and I were married, we decided that our home would have an open door policy. Meaning anyone could stop by at anytime. We felt the desire to be available, and for our home to be a safe comfortable haven when needed. I’m not going to lie, I’m an introvert. Not as bad as I used to be. After a year being married to my very extroverted husband I actually score closer to the “E” side of the Meyer’s Brigg scale now. I still don’t get energized by being around people all the time. I enjoy it and I feel fulfilled, but I don’t recharge by being around people.  However, I wasn’t called to be an introvert sitting at home recharging myself and enjoying God’s blessings all by myself. I was called to practice hospitality. Sometimes it’s hard. The anxiety gets to me too. But my desire to be there when someone needs me, to make someone feel loved and safe, to offer a hot cup of tea and listening ear; those desires are so much stronger than my anxiety.

So I’ll put the kettle on and share with you 5 ways to stay prepared for unexpected company:

1.) Remember why you’re doing this.

I love this quote:
“The heart of hospitality is about creating space for someone to feel seen and heard and loved. It’s about declaring your table a safe zone, a place of warmth and nourishment.” S. Niequist
If you feel the strong desire to open your heart and home to others that’s wonderful. We are told throughout God’s Word, to practice hospitality, give to those in need, and treat one other with kindness. It doesn’t need to be big and dramatic, but it does need to be loving and warm.

2.) Keep a stock of tea bags and pre made snacks on hand.baked-beverage-breakfast-2377474

You don’t need fresh baked goodies or a 5 course meal every time someone pops by for a visit. I like to keep a box of crackers, popcorn, or fresh fruit on hand. This makes it easy to put into a bowl and sit out. If you have the space for a guest shelf, or dedicated cabinet, this can be a huge time saver. Keep things such as crackers, cookies, tea biscuits, snack mix, and sugar alternatives for sweetening coffee and tea.
Asking the question “Can I get you anything?” can make people feel like they’re inconveniencing you. I usually sit out a snack and give them 2 choices for beverage, one cold and one hot. This lets them know that I’m already preparing something, and I just need them to make a decision. I usually don’t offer more than 2 choices because this can be overwhelming.

3.) Utilize that empty laundry basket.

663b5342af1425ab56cf2b144216b517I like to keep a laundry basket ready to grab and go. If there are any items laying around the living room or kitchen, they can be tossed into the basket and sat aside for a quick tidy up. This is especially useful if you have children and there are toys scattered about your home. You can also find a cute basket like this to match your décor to keep in your living room for those toys.

4.) Keep a canister of Lysol wipes on hand.

A quick and easy way to freshen up your bathroom and kitchen is wet wipes. I like the lemon scented Lysol wipes. I will run one over the bathroom sink and another over the toilet to give it a fresh sparkle. Easily wipe down kitchen countertops and appliances for an all over fresh feel.

burning-candles-decor-1832562.jpg5.)  Candles.

I love candles. They make your home smell great and add a cozy ambiance. Hint: I like to keep a long lighter on hand so it’s a quick start. The last thing I want to be doing is burning myself on a match or fumbling with a traditional lighter. Also, fabric freshener is great for freshening up your sofa or that bucket of blankets in your living room. I recommend a light clean scent that won’t overpower a room.
I would love to hear your tips and advice for always being ready for company! Drop a comment below.

Happy hosting,

Paige Baldwin

 

Breaking Bread: The Importance of Meals

Over and over again in the Bible, we see the term “breaking bread”. The Bible uses this baked-baked-good-bread-2067631term for three different events. It is used for shared meals, Holy communion, and even talking about the Crucifixion. I loved my study of each of these specific events. Today we’ll be specifically talking about breaking bread in terms of sharing meals with others in our community for the purpose of meeting needs and providing fellowship.

Acts 2:46  “Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts”

Did you know that 20% of all American meals are eaten in the car? Another study shows that on average, nearly 50% of our meals are eaten alone. In 2010, a journal report showed that only 43% of American families eat together every day. This doesn’t even touch on how many families sit down with one another in fellowship to share a meal. As a nurse, I want to go into the negative physical and emotional health effects of our declining eating habits, but I’ll save that for another time and place. Today we’ll simply look at the importance of sitting down together and sharing a meal. I believe that in regards to fellowship and hospitality, sitting down together for a meal is one of the most important things you can do. Just the act of inviting someone to your table speaks volumes. It is a tangible way to extend love to friends and grace to strangers in need. Christ Himself extended that same grace over and over again, and we’re told that after He calls all Saints home for good, we are invited to sit at the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. (Revelation 19)  Not a church service, not a conference, not a seminar. But at the table.

Jesus didn’t run projects, establish ministries, or put on events. He ate meals”
Tim Chester “A Meal with Jesus”

One of the passages I turn to frequently to illustrate the importance of eating meals together is in the book of Acts:

Acts 2:42-46  “They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts…”

caffeine-coffee-cuisine-15280133 things happen when you sit down to a meal together

1.) Physical needs are met
It’s no secret that we need to eat to live. Whether it’s a stranger who needs a hot meal, a friend who doesn’t feel up to cooking, or that new college kid at church who could benefit from some home cooking. Romans 12:13 tells us “Share with the LORD’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality.” If there is a need, we as Believers should be the first to jump up and say “I’ll do it!” It doesn’t feel natural at first, and that’s ok. Inviting people into your home can be scary until you have experience. That’s why we’re told to practice. Start simple. Ready-to-cook pizza and bagged salad is a great place to start. Once you start feeling more comfortable having people in your home, you can start cooking. But again, stay simple and work your way up to a “from-scratch” meal. God told us to practice hospitality, not practice fine dining parties with elaborate meals. It’s not about perfection and talent, it’s about presence and togetherness. If that’s a rotisserie chicken and instant mashed potatoes, so be it.

2.) Emotional needs are met
Looking at that same passage, sometimes those needs aren’t just physical. Sometimes there are emotional needs that need to be met in a non-threatening environment. What better environment than around your kitchen table? Those who eat alone can experience more loneliness, depression, and in turn reach for unhealthy options, or skip meals altogether. By inviting those people to your table, you’re not only providing for their physical hunger, but for their emotional hunger as well. Think about how nice it feels to be asked for dinner, or even just coffee. It meets the desire for fellowship. It makes your heart happy. Sharing a meal is about more than food. It’s about friendship, grace, and love. When we sit down around a dinner table, our emotional need for connection is met. “…They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts”

3.) Spiritual needs are met
Looking through the life of Jesus, we see over and over again where he would share profound truths and encouragement with people around a table. It was around a dinner table that He redeemed Zacchaeus from a life of dishonesty and thievery (Luke 5). It was around a dinner table that He extended grace to Mary as she washed His feet (Luke 7). It was around a dinner table that He taught Mary, Martha, and Lazarus the importance of fellowship with Him (Luke 10).  It was even around a dinner table that Jesus told us that He was the only answer to our greatest need (Luke 22). There are times when people need grace or encouragement. There are times when people need to hear a hard truth. There are times when people need to dive deeper in the Word of God and learn together. Through the example of Jesus Christ Himself, we learn that there is no better place than around our table.

Following the example Jesus set for us, we can be encouraged to reach out and extend cutlery-dining-room-flatware-269264the invitation to come around our table and share a meal. You never know what that might mean to someone, and how that simple invitation may change their life. If you are looking for more information, an excellent book that talks about this subject is “A Meal With Jesus” by Tim Chester.  I would love to hear your feedback, as well as any tips you have for simple table hospitality. Drop a comment below or email me here. God bless!

Paige Baldwin

 

 

Recipe for Homemade Bread:

Ingredients:
2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (1pkg)
2 1/4 cup warm water
1 TBS sugar PLUS 1/4 cup sugar
1 TBS salt
2 TBS olive oil
6 – 6 1/2 cups all purpose flour
Butter for pans and plastic wrap

Directions:
~In a large bowl or stand mixer, combine yeast, warm water, and 1 TBS sugar. Let stand until bubbly and foamy.
~Add remaining sugar, salt, oil, and 4 cups of the flour and mix until smooth.
~Add remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time to form a soft, smooth, and slightly sticky dough.
~Knead for 3-5 minutes until smooth and then roll into a ball.
~Place the dough in a buttered bowl and cover with buttered plastic wrap.
~Let rise for one hour in a warm place.
~When dough has risen, punch down and divide in half.
~Roll out each half into a long rectangle shape 8 inches wide. Then roll the dough up to form a log shape
~Place the dough logs seam down into a buttered pan and cover with buttered plastic wrap and a towel.
~Let rise for another hour in a warm place.
~Preheat oven to 375º. Bake for 30-35 minutes until golden brown and have a hollow sound when tapped.
~Remove to rack and cool slightly before serving.

This bread can easily be frozen by letting in cool completely and wrapping tightly in plastic wrap before putting in the freezer. I wouldn’t suggest keeping it frozen for more than 2 weeks for best taste. To use, take out and let thaw in refrigerator overnight.

Easy Home Cleaning Schedule

Saving house cleaning for one day can be overwhelming, especially if you’re a full time mother or career woman (sometimes both at the same time). But spending every spare minute of every day cleaning is not the better option! So what do you do to simplify and save time cleaning? The first step in organizing and simplifying your task list is to create one. Create a list for daily tasks, weekly tasks, monthly tasks, and seasonally/yearly tasks. Then separate out what needs to be done when. This can save a ton of time and headache going forward!

Your daily tasks should include:

  • Make the bed
  • Wash dishes/utilize dishwasher
  • Sweep floors clean of all food
  • Wipe down all counter surfaces
  • Clear daily clutter
  • Collect and sort mail

These tasks are done in between deeper cleanings, on a daily basis, to help maintain a tidy and sanitary home. These are small tasks that should take under 5 minutes each (the exception being dishes, depending on family size and availability of a dishwasher).

Any other task that can be done in under 1 minute should be done daily as well.
Example:
Put away your shoes
Throw out old food
Put books away

Your weekly task list should include:

  • Clean the toilets
  • Wipe down appliances
  • Clean the stove (see recipe for easy homemade cleaner below)
  • Clean sink/garbage disposal
  • Change linens
  • Mop floors
  • Dust the furniture
  • Laundry (adjust frequency to fit your needs)

These tasks can be split up and assigned a day of the week so you’re not putting everything on one day and exhausting yourself. Remember that we are to work 6 days and Sabbath 1 day per week. (Exodus 20:8-10a: Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work…) God commands our resting 1 day a week, so plan appropriately. An example of how this task schedule might work is pictured below, but of course it can be adjusted to fit your individual needs.

Cleaningschedule.png

Download the free “My Cleaning Routine” checklist here!

 

Your monthly task list should include:

  • Scrub out microwave and refrigerator
  • Wax hardwood floors
  • Wash all windows and doors
  • Dust walls (wash if needed)
  • Disinfect garbage

These tasks will keep your house looking new and smelling great. Dusting the walls will help with potential allergens and get rid of problem causing bacteria. We all know that kid that licks the walls. We may as well accept it and keep them as clean as we can. Disinfecting garbage cans by wiping them out and down with Lysol monthly will keep that garbage stench out of your home, and help to keep away gnats and other unwelcomed visitors.

Your seasonally/yearly task list should include:

  • Shampoo carpets (bi-annually)
  • Clean out pantry (quarterly to bi-annually)
  • Wash comforters and drapes (bi-annually)
  • Clean blinds (annually)
  • Clean out closets (with season change)
  • Clean out desk and shred documents that are no longer needed (yearly)

Yearly/Twice yearly tasks refresh your home after a long stale winter, or after busy holiday seasons. Refreshing carpets will keep your house looking well cared for, and washing old allergens out of the comforters and drapes will keep your body happy. If you do set aside a day or weekend for these tasks, be sure to take some time for yourself afterward. Ladies, go out and get a pedicure, guys go play golf. Do something to relax after a long deep cleaning.

I want to close by saying this. If you are a busy mom and/or career woman and you just don’t have the time you want/need to put into those deep cleans, it’s alright to get help. It’s not shameful to hire a cleaner to come once a month (or once a week for that matter) to help you. It’s ok to ask for help. Let me tell you friends, I am not a mom yet, but I am a full time wife, nurse, and blogger. And guess what. That’s right, I just hired a cleaning lady. She’s going to come once a month and help me do the things I just don’t have time for. And I’ve decided that I’m not going to be embarrassed or ashamed of it at all. Don’t push yourself to exhaustion to try and prove something to people whose opinion doesn’t matter. If you need help, get help.

 

Happy Cleaning!

~Paige Baldwin

 

 

Easy Stovetop Cleaner (works with flat top stoves)

Make a paste using Dawn dish soap, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide. Rub it into your stove top paying extra attention to burnt areas. Let dry for a few hours, or overnight. Use a soft, warm, wet cloth to gently scrub away dried paste. Buff with microfiber cloth. This keeps your stove top clean and shiny.

10 Tips to a Tidy Home

Tidyhomepic

Opening your home is always less scary when it’s neat and orderly. My stress level is at an all time low when I host right after a deep clean and clutter purge. But let’s be honest, we don’t always have time to do deep cleanings every couple of days for that spotless magazine look. Nor are we meant to. Homes are living spaces, and as such it’s ok to show signs of life and activity. However, having a tidy home improves your mood as well as decreasing your fear of last minute company popping by for a visit.

“A clean house empowers us to be more while doing less to stay ahead of the chaos.” (Love the Home you Have by Melissa Michaels)

Below are my top 10 tips to keeping your home neat and tidy, and therefore always ready for the unexpected.

1.) Open your mail daily and throw spam mail away. Invest in a folder or organizer for important mail, but only after you’ve opened it. Don’t hoard coupons you’ll probably never use. Only save the grocery ads until you’ve made your shopping list for the week. (TIP: Notate the price and location next to the item on your list so you can trash the ads.)

2.) Fold laundry as you pull it out of the dryer. This will keep things neat and organized, while also preventing hard wrinkles from forming.

3.) Start your dishwasher every night and empty it every morning. This keeps clean dishes in your cabinet, and horrid smells out of your kitchen. If there’s not enough for a load, hand wash them and put them away.

663b5342af1425ab56cf2b144216b517
You can find cute baskets ranging in size and color at Target or Amazon

4.) Keep a cute basket in the living room for last minute toys, books, etc. (TIP: Purchase a cute basket for each child to keep by their door. At the end of the day they can use it to collect all of their loose items throughout the house, and carry to their bedrooms easily.) Find my favorite baskets here.

5.) Use a basket or quilt rack to store blankets instead of the back of your sofa. This keep the blankets neat, in one place, and out of the way until needed.

6.) No more than 3 items on each side table. Example: A stack of coasters, a box of tissues, and a candle. A lamp, a remote, and a stack of coasters. A book, a candle, and a stack of coasters. (I really like coasters, and a stack counts as one item.)

7.) Keep a container of Lysol or baby wipes available for quick counter wipe down.

8.) Take your shoes off in your bedroom rather than the living room. Shoe clutter is still clutter. (TIP: Have a small mat or rug in the corner of your entry way if you need quick access to a pair of shoes, or for guests)

9.) Keep a bottle of room/fabric freshener nearby. Things that smell good, appear cleaner. This is especially true if you have animals. Find my favorite freshener here

10.) Make your bed every morning when you get up. A messy bed makes a whole room look messy. And if your bedroom door is open it can ruin even the neatest of homes. Discipline yourself, and make it as soon as you get up. (TIP: the lower the number of decorative pillows on your bed, the higher the probability that your husband will gladly and joyfully make it for you. Decorative pillows are poison to men.)

Screenshot_20190612-094032-01

Check out my Resources page for a recommended product list on Amazon. These are products that I love and use to help keep clean and organized. (This is just a helpful list. I do not make a commission for sharing these products with you.)

Paige

 

 

This post contains affiliate links. Upon purchase, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.